Sunday, November 04, 2012

I take it back

On the feast of St Matthias I normally comment that, strangely, Christian tradition has never followed the example of the Apostles and chosen their successors by drawing lots. It would seem the obvious way to choose bishops if we are concerned to follow the example of the Scriptures but, oddly, in the return ad fontes asked for by Vatican II this never came up.

So I was pleasantly surprised to learn about the process used for electing a Coptic pope where a blindfolded boy chosen at random picks out one of three names. I wonder if any other Christians  use random methods to choose their leaders?

Congratulations to bishop Tawadros: he has a difficult job ahead of him.

4 comments:

EFpastor emeritus said...

At LEAST A BLIND LAY-PERSON WAS INVOLVED IN THE SELECTION!I CANNOT SEE THAT HAPPENING WITH US....EVEN FOR SELECTION OF A BISHOP - NOTWITHSTANDING THAT EVEN A BLIND PERSON MIGHT MAKE BETTER SELECTION THAN ROME SOMETIME DOES.

Sue Sims said...

The Amish follow this procedure as well.

1569 Rising said...

But, we have had a mysterious system of choosing Bishops for years. It is called "The Magic Circle"
I'd rather have a blind boy picking names from a hat.

ScepticalBeliever said...

I do wish people would first read and endeavour to understand what they wish to comment on.

I quote: It was a remarkable ceremony. The ancient liturgy of morning service at St Mark's Cathedral in Cairo was the setting for an even more extraordinary ritual.

A young boy was chosen, brought forward to the alter, then blindfolded. He then picked one of three pieces of paper from a jar.